What do the expressions Troll, Moral Hazard & Ethical Glass Ceiling have in common?

I just added all of them to my glossary!
Ethical Glass Ceiling
A term my sister coined to mean the point at which an actor (as in, a person taking action) stops asking the question “Is this an okay thing to do?” because he has arrived at a plausible answer that justifies taking the action that most benefits him or his organization. It doesn’t rise to the level of rationalization, but it’s why economic actors don’t agonize over ethical fine points.
Moral Hazard
Originally, the risk that the presence of a contract will affect on the behavior of one or more parties. The classic example is in the insurance industry, where coverage against a loss might increase the risk-taking behavior of the insured. I use it more broadly to include possibilities such as having welfare removes natural barriers to drug addiction (ie, the need to earn money for drugs puts limits on drug addiction).
Troll
Also, Internet Troll. Strictly speaking, one who posts a deliberately provocative message to a newsgroup or message board with the intention of causing maximum disruption and argument. I use the expression to describe professional cognitive infiltrators hired by the government as per then-Information Czar Cass Sunstein’s plan to disrupt “truther” websites, but who now monitor the Internet and the airwaves for any discussion that threatens the official narrative of news stories and tries to disrupt them. I also use the term “troll-dar” like I use “truth-dar” (see below.)
 

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