Native Advertising: New Glossary Entry

ht Sir Tim of the Tunnels….

According to outbrain.com,

Native advertising is the use of paid ads that match the look, feel and function of the media format in which they appear.

Native ads are often found in social media feeds, or as recommended content on a web page. Unlike display ads or banner ads, native ads don’t really look like ads. They look like part of the editorial flow of the page. The key to native advertising is that it is non-disruptive – it exposes the reader to advertising content without sticking out like a sore thumb

Seems to me, however, that native advertising goes way beyond this, especially when it comes to Big Pharma. It’s been suggested that Big Pharma buys the bulk of mainstream TV’s commercial space not to sell their products directly to consumers (consumers couldn’t get them directly if they wanted to – customers are selected and directed by their physicians), but to dictate what does and does not get aired in the programming of the station, primarily the news broadcasts. Censoring negative news about drugs is just the first step. Now we seem to see the news broadcast itself being a nonstop ad for–of course you know what I’m about to write–vaccines.

As I have long said, the content is the commercial. This is now more obvious than ever.

*Lest you think I looked high and low for the featured image in this post, I can assure you I did not. I searched “CBS video vaccine” and this was the FIRST video that popped up.

Vaxist & MK Apartheid (glossary double header)

A vaxist is someone who judges another’s character based on their CoViD-19 vaccine status. This is real but also gives rise to the perception of vaxism where there is none. “Was that nurse a bitch cause she’s a bitch? or was she a bitch because I’m not vaxxed”….and it goes from there. Welcome to Apartheid!

And that brings us to another glossary entry, MK Apartheid. One of our favorite patrons pointed out that in the Elizabeth Holmes trial, both sides agreed to only use jurors who are “fully vaccinated” against CoViD-19. One point among several to make here is that there is definitely a different cast of mind between the vaccinated and those who have not chosen to get vaccinated at this point. Could the apartheid that’s descending have the impact of segregating society based on a person’s response to social pressure or propaganda? And remember, with “ism” it doesn’t even matter the intent so much as the impact.

New Glossary Entry: The AstraZeneca Effect

The AstraZeneca Effect describes the impact of the AstraZeneca CoViD Vaccine trials. The earliest “variants of concern” occurred in and only in the places where AstraZeneca did their trials:

AstraZeneca did their initial trials in the UK, Brazil, South Africa & India

The World Health Organizations initial variants of concern, alpha, beta, gamma & delta were first detected in the UK, Brazil, South Africa & India.

Just in case the articles disappear, here are the full texts:

 
astrazeneca.com

 

COVID-19 vaccine AZD1222 clinical trial resumed in Japan, follows restart of trials in the UK, Brazil, South Africa and India

 

The Phase I/II clinical trial for the COVID-19 vaccine AZD1222 has resumed in Japan after discussion with the Japanese Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA).

A standard review process triggered a voluntary pause to vaccination across all global trials on 6 September to allow review of safety data by an independent committee. Their recommendations have been supported by international regulators in the UK, Brazil, South Africa, India and now in Japan, who have deemed that the trials are safe to resume.

AstraZeneca continues to work with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to facilitate review of the information needed to make a decision regarding resumption of the US trial. The safety of trial participants is of paramount importance and we are committed to upholding the highest standards of conduct in clinical trials.

AZD1222

AZD1222 was co-invented by the University of Oxford and its spin-out company, Vaccitech. It uses a replication-deficient chimpanzee viral vector based on a weakened version of a common cold virus (adenovirus) that causes infections in chimpanzees and contains the genetic material of the SARS-CoV-2 virus spike protein. After vaccination, the surface spike protein is produced, priming the immune system to attack the SARS-CoV-2 virus if it later infects the body.

AstraZeneca

AstraZeneca (LSE/STO/Nasdaq: AZN) is a global, science-led biopharmaceutical company that focuses on the discovery, development and commercialisation of prescription medicines, primarily for the treatment of diseases in three therapy areas – Oncology, Cardiovascular, Renal & Metabolism, and Respiratory & Immunology. Based in Cambridge, UK, AstraZeneca operates in over 100 countries and its innovative medicines are used by millions of patients worldwide. Please visit astrazeneca.com and follow the Company on Twitter @AstraZeneca.

Contacts

For details on how to contact the Investor Relations Team, please click here. For Media contacts, click here.

 
 
bbc.com

 

What are the Delta, Gamma, Beta and Alpha Covid variants?

By Michelle Roberts

By Michelle Roberts
Health editor, BBC News online

coronavirusimage source, Getty Images

An outbreak of cases of the Delta variant of Covid is causing concern in China.

More than 300 cases have been spotted in 10 days – leading to increased testing and travel restrictions.

What is the Delta variant?

There are thousands of different types – or variants – of Covid circulating across the world. One of them, known as Delta or B.1.617.2, appears to be spreading quickly in many countries including the UK, where it has become the dominant variant.

The UK classes Delta as a “variant of concern” – these are kept under the closest watch by health officials.

Other current variants of concern also include:

  • Alpha (B.1.1.7), first identified in the UK but which spread to more than 50 countries
  • Beta (B.1.351), first identified in South Africa but which has been detected in at least 20 other countries, including the UK
  • Gamma (P.1), first identified in Brazil but which has spread to more than 10 other countries, including the UK

Viruses mutate all the time and most changes are inconsequential. Some even harm the virus. But others can make the disease more infectious or threatening – and these mutations tend to dominate.

Graphic shows current names for covid variants and WHO's proposed Greek names

Is Delta more dangerous?

There is no evidence that Delta – or any of the other variants – cause more serious illness for the vast majority of people.

As with the original version, the risk remains highest for people who are elderly or have significant underlying health conditions.

But even so, if a variant is more infectious it will lead to more deaths in an unvaccinated population.

Vaccines offer high protection against severe illness with Covid-19, including infections caused by variants of concern. The shots also reduce the risk of infection. But they are not perfect and do not completely eliminate all risk.

It is unclear how many people in China are fully vaccinated, although authorities say more than 1.6 billion doses have been administered so far.

The advice to avoid infection remains the same for all strains: wash your hands, keep your distance, wear a face covering and be vigilant about ventilation.

How are the mutants behaving?

The variants of concern have all undergone changes to their spike protein – the part of the virus which attaches to human cells.

Delta has some potentially important ones (such as L452R) that might make it spread more easily.

There is no evidence to indicate it causes more severe disease or might make current vaccines less effective, say UK officials.

One mutation, called N501Y, shared by the Alpha, Gamma and Beta, seems to make the virus better at infecting cells and spreading.

Experts have found a small number of cases of Alpha with this change too.

Chart showing what the variants are and how they happen

Presentational white space

Will vaccines still work against variants?

Current vaccines were designed for earlier versions of coronavirus, which means they may not be the ideal match for new variants and so might not work quite as well.

But experts say they are still very effective at protecting lives by cutting the risk of severe illness:

  • An analysis by Public Health England found two doses of either the Pfizer or AstraZeneca vaccine was more than 90% effective against hospitalisations for Covid-19 caused by Delta
  • A single dose, however, was less effective at preventing illness from Delta, compared to how well it worked against Alpha.

Doctors say it is vital that people get both doses to gain maximum protection against existing and emerging variants.

Do variants mean booster jabs are more likely?

Experts are confident existing vaccines can be redesigned to better tackle emerging mutations.

The UK government has a deal with biopharmaceutical company CureVac to develop vaccines against future variants, and has pre-ordered 50 million doses.

Depending on how variants continue to develop, these could potentially be used to offer a booster vaccine to older or clinically vulnerable people later in the year.

Royal Bermuda Yacht Club Cocktail

I accidentally made the original recipe of this and found it tough to choke down–I made some tweaks and it was fantastic…then I saw in the original post where I found the recipe, a modified recipe and it was great too…this is the formula I settled on: 

3 ounces Koloa Gold or Mount Gay Eclipse rum

1 ounce lime juice

1/2 ounce Velvet Falernum (never heard of it? you have been missing out!)

1/2 ounce dry curacao (i haven’t tried this drink with anything else, but I think Cointreau, Grand Marnier or triple sec would also work; cold-glass calls for Clement Creole Shrubb which I never even heard of but I’m guessing it’s the best)

1/4 simple syrup

Chill your glasses. Shake this with ice. Strain into two glasses and enjoy. This is my new favorite cocktail…

 

I Call BS! The Shortage of Truckers is a Result of Deliberate Policy!

post-purge repost (originally posted April 2018)…

Nowhere in this article does it mention the systematic policy attack on truckers. Extreme restrictions on truckers’ flexibility over when to drive has crushed productivity–rising wages or line-hauls won’t make up for having to spend more hours idle for every delivery. Demand for truckers is going up not only as demand for transportation has increased but also as each trucker is forced to be less productive, an effect that compounds the shortage of drivers by causing truckers who can’t make a living to exit  the industry resulting in even fewer trucker-hours to meet rising demand.

I have seen the momentum toward autonomous trucking accelerating past that for passenger cars since the company Otto was created by some well-connected tech folks to retrofit existing trucks with self-driving technology–that’s a sign of a short timeline IMO.

This WSJ article is portraying the undersupply of truckers as an unfortunate market failure–watch out for future articles that build on this underlying false assumption to argue that we have no choice but to adapt infrastructure to self-driving trucks in a hurry.

Of course, those who pay the freight will love such a subsidy allowing them to switch to a government-subsidized technology rather than compensate for government-implemented productivity crushing policies with higher wages. My guess is they are all in this together. Similarly, the uber-lyft model does not work without self-driving technology. Billions upon billions of dollars have been pumped into these businesses for years by very smart people–surely they know driverless is coming despite the tremendous cost and disruption it will visit upon taxpayers and laborers alike.

Maybe I’m wrong, but the way this article deliberately ignores the real problem with declining trucker supply makes me wonder, Why even write the article? Obviously, there’s some agenda at work. We will see what it is. #WTWOF

Trucking Companies Are Struggling to Attract Drivers to the Big-Rig Life
The U.S. freight market is speeding ahead, but recruiting new truck drivers to meet demand is proving harder to rev up.







New Cocktail: The Last Word

For the fatigued palate…just what the doctor ordered!

If I ever had a cold and had to go to work–at least during my waitressing years–Elsie, the old German matriarch of the night crew, would have me sip a shot of Green Chartreuse (maybe that’s redundant, but there is a Yellow Chartreuse!) Boy would that stuff clear out your sinuses! Ever since then, I’ve thought of Chartreuse as medicine and stayed away–until now. As I cycle through the easy stuff–the approachable cocktails–I find some of them start to taste the same, especially the gin sour types (my favorites). The flavor profile that isn’t so approachable–the anise-to-menthol type stuff like absinthe and Chartreuse are a bit more challenging but a welcome change of pace…I’m a huge fan of equal parts cocktails because they’re usually boozy & balanced but most of all because the recipes are so easy to remember! All booze cocktails are a bit hard for me to swallow these days, though, so I like an equal parts with a bit of citrus. The Last Word is all of the above & I do believe it has a bit of a cult following and I totally get why…Here ya go (from cold-glass.com)

3/4 oz dry gin (I loved Nolet’s in this but plymouth, etc will do)

3/4 oz green Chartreuse (expensive but worth it…warning, the darn stuff is 110 proof!)

3/4 oz Luxardo maraschino liqueur

3/4 oz fresh squeezed lime juice

Keep the drink small so it stays cold; make sure you put your nick & nora or martini glasses or coupes in the freezer before you start making the drink, & shake it with ice until very cold. Strain & serve….Then find a quiet place to sit and savor…

Mezcal Sour …OMGosh….

Mezcal Sour

  • 1½ oz. fresh lime juice
  • 1½ oz. Mezcal
  • 1 oz. Amaro Montenegro
  • 1 tsp. light agave nectar
  • 1 large egg white
  • Angostura bitters and lime twist (for serving)
  • Shake lime juice, mezcal, amaro, agave, and egg white in a cocktail shaker (or in a tightly lidded 1-qt. glass jar) until frothy, about 1 minute. Fill shaker with ice, cover, and shake again until outside is frosty, about 30 seconds. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a coupe glass. Garnish with a few drops of Angostura bitters (drag a toothpick through drops to create a swirly pattern if you wish). Top with lime twist.

Southern Favorites: Hurricane & Alabama Slammer

Hurricane (my Mardi Gras pick)

[…I just used dark rum and white rum but I bet it’s even better with spiced rum….]
2 oz passion fruit juice (welch’s makes a great passion fruit juice blend in a carton)
1 oz orange juice

 

Juice of a half lime
1 tbsp simple syrup
1 tbsp grenadine
GARNISH WITH CHERRY AND ORANGE SLICE

 

HOW TO MAKE:

1. Add rum, passion fruit juice, orange juice, lime juice, simple syrup and grenadine into a shaker.
2. Shake and pour into crushed ice-filled hurricane glass or other specialty glass.
3. Garnish with orange and cherry. 

Alabama Slammer (hear me out!)

My liquor cabinet is overflowing with stuff I only used once and I can’t keep buying weird little things to put in my craft cocktails if there’s no room to store the bottles, so my husband and I are doing a “liquor store challenge” and not buying anything from the liquor store for one year (ending this Thanksgiving). So far so good, but we’re only four months in…In this spirit (!), I’m trying to make cocktails with what I have…and sadly, I have a super huge bottle of Southern Comfort – not my favorite cause it’s so darn sweet! but the Alabama Slammer isn’t bad & can be made with a couple of different substitutes so you can actually make it delicious…here’s what I came up with…
 
1 ounce (some recipes say 2 ounces!) Southern Comfort OR dark rum (like Koloa, my favorite) OR whiskey (in keeping with the variation below)
1 ounce amaretto OR creme de noyaux (which is MUCH less sweet) OR a combo of both
1 ounce sloe gin
2 ounces OJ
 
shake it in a shaker with ice then strain it into an old fashioned glass filled with ice
 
here’s a variation I haven’t tried yet, but boy I’d like to!
1 ounce amaretto
1 ounce bourbon
1/2 ounce sloe gin
1/2 ounce lemon juice
 
shake it in a shaker with ice then strain it into a chilled cordial glass